School board adopts paperless strategy for meetings

March 6th, 2014 | Posted by Kevin Corley in Document Management
School board adopts paperless strategy for meetings

Going paperless has many benefits for school boards, and as such more schools are embracing the necessary technology to do without paper minutes, agendas and notes.

The Gustine Unified School District recently invested in tablets and document management software to accomplish its own paper conversion efforts. According to The West Side Index & Gustine Press-Standard, the school board prints nearly two dozen packets each time the board meets. The new system saves time and money, while providing many other benefits.

"The kids are ahead of us in what they are using," Board President Melanie Gomes told the source. "We should set the example. We can do it too."

The school adopted a paperless strategy for several reasons. For one, it would allow them to provide meeting information to the public faster. Additionally, it would reduce costs over time as the board looks to cut its budget and save other, more critical demands. The board plans to keep paper packets on hand for the first few meetings after the system goes into effect in order to ease the transition.

The best way for any school to drive a paperless strategy forward is to invest in high-quality conversion services to bring its archived records online and support the information demands that creating meeting packets entails. This will help with data management while promoting increased productivity. Additionally, board members will be able to access minutes and other notes whenever they like, preparing for meetings ahead of time, or referencing information faster when needing to make a point during a session.

High-quality conversion and content management services will align capability with the expectations that schools have for paperless strategies, while keeping their costs and resource drain lower.

Brought to you by Image One Corporation, providing complete information governance since 1994.

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: